What are we really measuring? Part 3. 

By |2018-06-01T17:12:42+00:00June 1st, 2018|Golf Statistics|0 Comments

This is part 3 of our “What are we really measuring?” Series. To view the other parts, click here for part 1 and here for part 2.

Greens Hit in Regulation (GIRs) is defined as: “Percentage of time a player was able to hit the green in regulation”.

The GIR statistic only looks at the number of times you successfully putted for birdie, it doesn’t take into account the quality of the shot; an approach shot hit to 55ft from the hole is worth as much as an approach shot hit to 1 foot.

A green hit in regulation is when a player has a putt for birdie from the green. Golfers have for a long time used this statistic as an indicator of your approach shot skill level. Similar to the Driving Accuracy percentage above, the GIR statistic only looks at the number of times you successfully putted for birdie. A shot hit to 55ft from the hole is worth as much as a shot hit to 1 foot. GIRs are related to the driving accuracy statistic as well: if you hit a really bad tee shot and have to chip out sideways, then you can’t successfully hit the green in regulation. The bad tee shot is robbing you of the chance to demonstrate your approach shot capabilities, and this is negatively effecting your GIR number despite the tee shot not having anything to do with the approach shot quality.

The greens hit statistic also doesn’t take into account the distance from which the shot was hit from.

Furthermore, GIRs also don’t take into account the distance from which the shot was hit from. A shot hit to 10 feet from 200 yards is a better performance than a shot hit to 10 feet from 100 yards.

About the Author:

Thomas is a professional golfer and has played events on the European Tour, Web.Com Tour, Asian Tour, PGA Tour of Australasia as well as on PGA Tour China/Canada/Latinoamerica. He built Anova.Golf when no existing products could answer his detailed performance questions. The resulting information from Anova was astonishing: what he thought of as his biggest strength ended up being his biggest weakness.

Leave A Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

This website uses cookies and third party services. Ok